December 16, 2017, 03:11:08 AM
News: Hey, we have forums!
  Pages: 1 ... 19 20 [21] 22
Print
Author Topic: Weird Underwater Creatures  (Read 364790 times)
ShadowOnTheSun
Bit
***
Posts: 24



View Profile
« Reply #300 on: July 05, 2010, 04:08:31 PM »

I don't think this has been seen here before.  It doesn't look weird...but it is
 

This  type of jellyfish can grow and entirely new body when injured.  Not just grow a limb or anything like some reptiles, but a completely new body.
You know what this means....TIME LORD JELLYFISH!

An article about them can be found here
« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 12:21:04 AM by ShadowOnTheSun » Logged
Zoko
Super Bit
********
Posts: 402



View Profile
« Reply #301 on: July 05, 2010, 10:28:58 PM »

It's weird enough for me.
Logged

I refuse to have a signature!
Alphasoldier
Dream Bit
**********
Posts: 1810


Zero Suit!

alphasoldier@hotmail.com alphasoldier1990
View Profile
« Reply #302 on: July 06, 2010, 12:45:28 AM »

Sounds like that jellyfish is going to be tortured for the rest of his endless life to figure out how it's happening, poor thing.
I bet that eventually they'll just figure it has a long lifespan and that the renewing of cells thing is something that can be done online a limited amount of times.
Logged

God sees and knows everything, but at least he won't gossip about it.
Aeolius
Mini Bit
**
Posts: 8


View Profile
« Reply #303 on: August 19, 2010, 08:27:21 PM »

Sometimes a creature is not weird because of its appearance...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcwCYIfm6eA
Logged
tcarsonmcphersoni
Mini Bit
**
Posts: 2


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #304 on: November 04, 2010, 01:12:46 PM »



The goblin shark, Mitsukurina owstoni, is a deep-sea shark, the sole living species in the family Mitsukurinidae.The most distinctive characteristic of the goblin shark is the unorthodox shape of its head
Logged

I work as a specialist technician inside a fertility hospital helping young couples in conceiving a child. The easiest way to generate more sperm
ax8l
Newbit
*
Posts: 1



View Profile WWW
« Reply #305 on: November 05, 2010, 12:06:08 PM »


Octopus with a slick hydrodynamic design  Cheesy
Logged

Xiagan
Global Moderator
Dream Bit
**********
Posts: 1452


"Does absolution lie above the waves?"

xiagan@gmail.com
View Profile
« Reply #306 on: November 11, 2010, 08:12:39 AM »

Octopus steals a video camera while recording.
Logged

"Sire, I had no need of that hypothesis." (Laplace)

~ www.xiagan.net ~
Alphasoldier
Dream Bit
**********
Posts: 1810


Zero Suit!

alphasoldier@hotmail.com alphasoldier1990
View Profile
« Reply #307 on: November 11, 2010, 11:19:28 AM »

Oh wow, that was epic. XD
Thanks Xiagan!
Logged

God sees and knows everything, but at least he won't gossip about it.
Wenzor
Bit Bit
****
Posts: 86


midnightmist0217@hotmail.com midnightmist021 fengzhi1@verizon.net
View Profile WWW
« Reply #308 on: November 13, 2010, 08:12:35 PM »


yay free ride!
Logged
BishopKayn
Bit
***
Posts: 44


loved ones are most worth protecting


View Profile Email
« Reply #309 on: November 16, 2010, 09:55:33 AM »

this seems perfect topic discussion here. Who here is familiar with the Humboldt squid war? Oddly enough fishermen and biologists get into very heated discussions turns out. Especially in as far down as northern Mexico all the way up to the infamous Humboldt California where the so called "Red Devils" found it the easiest to make their oceanic homes. The fishermen there also refer to them as "Man-eating Squids" due to numerous  fishing mishaps. However biologists have discovered that this octopus violence is in fact, anger based. Humboldt aren't naturally aggressive towards man. They are  a pack animal, which surprised marine biologists, normally squid are lone hunters. Additionally, and like a few other social squids (cuddlefish i believe), Humboldt communicate  with one another via pigment changes in their skin, giving them a bio-luminescent look as they tell one another where prey or other creatures are. When not hunted they will play with humans, tugging on divers for a few feet, or stealing loose  pieces of equipment to see what it may be or if it is edible. there are no documented incidents of unprovoked attacks on humans by Humboldts. When angered they turn a vibrant red color and these powerful six foot squid become lethal, usually seen when fishermen try to catch one. Here however they also can be seen doing something not typically attributed to the animal kingdom; mercy killing. Rather than allow a fellow squid to be captured they will pull it from the hook, and in several cases, the fisherman as well, killing both. Im on the squid's side but many people demonize them. I"ll try to dig up some better photos
 
Logged

Kiss a baby. It makes ya smile. Even Scrooge couldn't resist a grin.
Xiagan
Global Moderator
Dream Bit
**********
Posts: 1452


"Does absolution lie above the waves?"

xiagan@gmail.com
View Profile
« Reply #310 on: November 18, 2010, 02:57:18 PM »

Who knows... maybe it isn't extinct but waiting down in the Abyss...

Logged

"Sire, I had no need of that hypothesis." (Laplace)

~ www.xiagan.net ~
Lady-Succubus
Hero Bit
*********
Posts: 538


Aren't I cuuuutee? =^.^=


View Profile WWW
« Reply #311 on: December 09, 2010, 08:52:06 AM »

For some reason, when I saw the tongue eating one (again), I was suddenly reminded of the scene in Finding Nemo when one of the pelicans opens his mouth and Marlin and Dory are clinging onto his tongue and screaming.
Logged

Bored little neko, pouncing along, scattering posts everywhere. =^.^=
orangestar
Mini Bit
**
Posts: 2



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #312 on: December 15, 2010, 07:12:50 AM »

It lives thousands of feet under water and they decided to put it in a park? How cruel, unthoughtful, and just plain wrong!
Logged
mike2
Newbit
*
Posts: 1



View Profile WWW
« Reply #313 on: December 16, 2010, 07:51:37 AM »

wow what a creature Huh??
Logged
BishopKayn
Bit
***
Posts: 44


loved ones are most worth protecting


View Profile Email
« Reply #314 on: March 31, 2011, 05:13:19 AM »

I'll take them Isopods with these here Russian Invertebrates from the White Sea. All pictures belong to Alexander Semenov and most of my facts were pulled from the article written by Michele Collet here: http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/news-under-white-sea-alexander-semenov?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+environmentalgraffiti+%28Environmental+Graffiti%29
*see this link for the second sunstar image from the passage refrence below
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b8/Crossaster_papposus_-_Oslo_Zoological_Museum_-_IMG_9093.jpg
And to start off the weirdness how about a shrimp; with no exoskeleton. he's called the skeleton shrimp more because of his looks, something like a cross between an inchworm (during locomotion), a walking stick (while resting) and a praying mantis while hunting. they are small enough to blend perfectly with the local sea grass.  Next on the list is a four million year old veteran of the sea, a rare brachiopod, Semenov has caught a wonderful image of the creature's digestive organ known as its lophophore. According to Collet's research (also gathered by Semenov and other scientists) this variety has survived as it seems that crustaceans and fish dislike the taste of them.  They mention that sibling species have died off, perhaps with speculation due to a tastier flesh  Evil.  Our next White Sea guest may feel vaguely familiar, nicknamed the sandworm, Nerei Pellagica is a rather large invertebrate growing lengths up to 40 centimeters and in width almost as wide around as your thumb. The frill like tendrils on its side are twofold in function, acting as multiple lungs as well as paddle-like oars that it uses to move through the water around it. The follower up may make you lose your lunch while trying to get its own. Nereis Virens not only is fairly unattractive due to many folds of skin, when hunting has the mildly disturbing habit of throwing its entire pharynx and mouth forward to its meal. the first image is the critter's face the second his attack on either the Semenov's camera or prey off camera. Our next White Sea guest is a luminescent sea slug whose spine colors depend upon what it eats and is very common. This next russian specimen is actually unidentified creature called an amphipoda, of which there are some 230 species in the White Sea. Aphipoda are shell-less crustaceans whose legs are distincly different unlike their isopod cousins. Returning to the sea slugs here is another wonderful example, this one bears a green digestive system and is fairly rare where the second image of its golden brown cousin is of a much more common species.  Our next guest is rather tricky because it looks like a luminescent flower, its actually a plankton eating predator that is only 3-4 mm in size. This next gorgeous find by Semenov is the Lepidonotus Squamatus which have twelve scales. Here you see the green scales of a female, males would be a pale color due the the semen they carry.  Next runner up is an image Semenov took of the skin of a sunstar. A common sea star which holds the title for the fastest of its kind, and will devour anything, including other sunstars. I also found a regular image of one on wiki for which i've provided linkage* . Another of Semenov's White Sea Beauties would be the predatory juvenile  sea slug called the Sea Angel, they match their metabolism to their immediate prey the Sea butterfly. This creature gained its name from its podal lobes that look like black wings while it beats them through the water. They are about the size of a lentil. Now hopefully you aren't tired of reading yet, and we shall see if this doesn't take up a page  Afro. Next on the list is a Metridium Sea Anemone that has a central stalk surounded by its other long tendrils. However this specimen has purple tentacles, making it rare, normally they sport orange or yellow tendrils, Semenov once again outdoing himself.  Now this next image there are two creatures, and if it weren't for the counterpart's eyes you might miss the odd little guy, reportedly they look like small bears or elephant embryos, they are called Limanpontia, the two here are adults. They are generally brown but others can be lighter, as per the more visible one in Semenov's picture. This next specimen was dubbed the iSlug by Semenov, it is fairly common and its red color comes from its food source once again.
This next one doesn't really make the creature score but it sucks (somewhat literally) to be a microscopic critter near this interesting little plant http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_news/newsid_9399000/9399877.stm
















« Last Edit: March 31, 2011, 05:44:14 AM by BishopKayn » Logged

Kiss a baby. It makes ya smile. Even Scrooge couldn't resist a grin.
  Pages: 1 ... 19 20 [21] 22
Print
Jump to: